FAQ

[et_pb_section admin_label=”section”][et_pb_row admin_label=”row”][et_pb_column type=”4_4″][et_pb_image admin_label=”Image” src=”http://msdoorways.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/FAQ.png” show_in_lightbox=”off” url_new_window=”off” use_overlay=”off” animation=”off” sticky=”off” align=”center” force_fullwidth=”off” always_center_on_mobile=”on” use_border_color=”off” border_color=”#ffffff” border_style=”solid”] [/et_pb_image][et_pb_accordion admin_label=”Accordion”] [et_pb_accordion_item title=”My Remote(s) not working, what can be wrong?”]

 

  1. Change your batteries
  2. Codes may have been lost due to a power outage or power surge. Re-program your remote(s). For Liftmaster, Chamberlain and Craftsman remotes see our instructions page.

If neither of these options work the remote may be bad or the receiver on the opener may be going out.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item title=”My Door only goes down part way, stops and goes back up, the lights on the opener are flashing?”]

  1. Check photo eyes (small black boxes on the framing near the bottom of your garage door). Make sure the lights are on in both eyes. If no lights are on, call for service.
  2. If one photo eye light is on, but the other light is off, they have been knocked out of alignment. Take the photo eye with the light that is off and move it until the light comes on. If you move that one and still no light try moving the other side, it could have gotten hit. Make sure nothing obvious is in the way. Also check to make sure the vibration of the door does not make the photo eye go off again, if so check that the bolts holding it on are tight.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item title=”Our garage door opener will not do anything at all when we push the button. What should we look for first?”]

The first thing that you should verify is that the opener is still plugged into the electric outlet. Secondly you should confirm that there is power coming out of the electric outlet or plug the opener into another outlet with a temporary extension cord. If there is power to the operator then there is some type of mechanical or electrical problem within the garage door opener itself and may need to be diagnosed by a qualified service technician.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item title=”Our garage door opener was working fine, but all of a sudden we have to hold the wall button down to get the door to close. How can we get the door opener to start working properly again?”]

It sounds like the photo-eye safety beams are blocked, misaligned, or malfunctioning. Move any objects that
may be interfering with the signal and verify that the photo-eye LED lights are illuminated as per the manufacturer’s instructions. If the infrared beams are not blocked and the photo-cells appear that they are aligned, then you may need to call for service to diagnose and repair the problem. You will not be able to close the door with the remote control transmitter until the photo-cells are in proper working order.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item title=”Both of our transmitters quit working at the same time. Should we try changing the batteries in the remote controls?”]

Very seldom will the batteries in both transmitters go dead at the same time. Most likely the problem is in the radio receiver that is in the garage. It is also possible that the problem could be inside the operator itself and that it is no longer sending power to the receiver unit. (On some openers the receiver and logic board are combined together on one solid state circuit board).

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item title=”What should I use to lubricate my garage door?”]

To maintain your warranty, lubricate your garage door at least once a year with Garage Door Lube. This specially formulated lubricant can be purchased from our showroom. Apply the Door Lube to each of the following areas of the door: hinges, rollers (bearings and shafts), springs and end bearings (located at each end of the spring shaft). Once the application is completed, open and close the door to distribute the lubricant. Any non-silicone based lubricant can be substituted.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item title=”How should I clean my door?”]

That depends on the type of door you have and the enivronment where you live.

Normal Environment

Areas not exposed to salt, salt fog, dirt or other airborne substances, or where winter road salt is not used.
Every 6 Months
Wash the gargge door and windows with a mild soap (such as car wash soap or dishwashing soap) and water. Wash both interior and exterior. Rinse thoroughly. Do not use harsh or abrasive detergents. Lubricate track and hinges with a silicone or Teflon-based spray. Do not use WD-40® or grease. Then open and close the door to distribute the lubricant.
Every 12 Months
Inspect springs and hardware for signs of wear. Avoid any contact with the torsion springs as they are under extreme tension. Call to schedule a service call if you suspect any problems.

Coastal Environment

Areas with exposure to salt or salt fog.
Areas where winter road salt is used.
At Installation
Apply a good quality car wax to the garage door immediately after installation, unless you are going to paint the door. Follow car wax application instructions.
Every 6 Months
Wash the door and windows with a mild soap (such as car wash soap or dishwashing soap) and water. Wax the door, unless you are going to paint the door. Follow car wax application instructions. Wash both interior and exterior. Rinse thoroughly. Do not use harsh or abrasive detergents. Lubricate track and hinges with a silicone or Teflon-based spray. Do not use WD-40® or grease. Then open and close the door to distribute the lubricant.
Every 12 Months
Inspect springs and hardware for signs of wear. Avoid any contact with the torsion springs as they are under extreme tension. Call to schedule a service call if you suspect any problems.
As Needed
Wash the door and windows with a mild soap (such as car wash soap or dishwashing soap) and water. Wash both interior and exterior. Rinse thoroughly. Do not use harsh detergents.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item title=”My door seems unbalanced; what should I do?”]

We recommends checking the balance of your door once a year. To do this, close the door and then pull the red disconnect rope on your garage door opener. After pulling the disconnect rope the door should stay on or close to the floor. Next, raise the door about half way open, the door should stay at that position. And finally, raise the door all the way to the open position, where the door should remain open. If your door fails any of these tests, please contact us for an adjustment.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item title=”How should I prepare my door for the paint process?”]

All of our residential steel garage doors are already painted with a baked-on finish. No additional painting is required. If you want to apply another color, however,the following steps are required. NOTE:Only paint the exterior of the door while it is in the closed position.

  • Use the following solution, with a soft bristle brush, to remove mildew and other surface contaminants:
    1. 1 cup household detergent (Spic n Span® , Simple Green, etc.)
    2. 5 gallons warm water
  • Rinse thoroughly with water.
  • Use a powder cleanser like Comet®, diluted with water, with a soft bristle brush, to prepare the surface for better paint adhesion. Do not use sandpaper, deglossers, or liquid sandpaper to prepare the door surface.
  • Rinse thoroughly with water and allow to dry.
  • Use a high quality acrylic latex exterior paint. Apply according to manufacturer’s instructions. Do not use oil-based paint or any “rust-inhibitive” paint. Do not paint in direct sunlight or when surface is warm to the touch. Lap marks will result. Brush application is recommended.
  • Avoid getting paint on any gasket seals between door sections. Not all doors have these gasket seals.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item title=”What are the differences in non-insulated and insulated doors?”]

1-Layer Construction – Non Insulated
Steel
Constructed of a 24-gauge steel or thinner steel skin (depending on manufacturer and model) with no insulation. Offers basic protection and security.

2-Layer Construction – Vinyl Back Insulated
Steel – Insulation
Constructed of a 24-gauge steel or thinner steel skin(depending on manufacturer and model). Fitted with a layer of expanded polystyrene board insulation and a thin, protective vinyl back cover. Insulation increases energy-efficiency and soundproofing and adds greater structural integrity for quieter operation. Offers good protection and security.
3-Layer Construction – Metal Back Insulated
Steel – Insulation – Steel
Constructed of expanded polystyrene insulation or polyurethane insulation between two steel skins. Provides maximum energy efficiency, soundproofing and structural integrity. The quietest operating of all door types. Offers maximum protection and security.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item title=”What is R-value, and how does it benefit me?”]

R-value is a standardized measurement of thermal efficiency. The higher the R-value, the greater the garage door’s insulating properties.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item title=”What are the standard sizes of residential garage doors?”]

Standard sizes are whole width increments starting at 8′ wide and going to 20′ wide. Some door series have sizes smaller than that.  Standard heights are 7′ and 8′ tall. Odd-heights and odd-widths are also available and vary by individual door series.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item title=”What type of spring is better…extension or torsion?”]

The two types of springs used on garage doors today are extension and torsion springs. Extension springs are attached on either side of the door and stretch along the horizontal track when the door is closed. Torsion springs are typically located just above the top section of the door and are mounted to the header. They are wound springs and do not expand or contract when the door is moved. Torsion springs are a better choice because they balance the weight of the door better than extension springs for smoother operation and safety.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item title=”Do I need a lock on my garage door?”]

If an electric garage door opener has been installed on your door, it may not be necessary to have a lock. Properly installed, electric openers can function as the lock, making it improbable that an intruder would be able to lift your door from the outside. DASMA, the trade association for the garage door industry, discourages homeowners from attaching a lock when an opener has been installed, because too frequently, a child or other family member will accidentally lock the door. If someone then tries to open the door using the electric opener, the opener will pull against the lock causing the door to be damaged.

If no opener is installed on your garage door, a lock is highly recommended.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item title=”When referring to steel gauge, does a lower number mean thicker steel?”]

The lower the gauge, the thicker (and stronger) the steel. For example, 24-gauge steel is thicker than 27-gauge steel. However, a “sandwich” constructed door with two 27-gauge steel skins bonded to an insulated core is stronger than a “steel frame” door with a single 24-gauge steel skin.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item title=”Do I need to reinforce my garage door if I am installing an automatic garage door opener?”]

Yes! Failure to properly install opener reinforcement will result in damage to the garage door and will void the warranty. The reinforcement configuration differs depending on the model number and size of the garage door. Refer to the installation manual supplied with our garage doors for specific instructions. For more information, see the “Attaching an Automatic Opener to “Pan Construction” Garage Doors Using Punched Angle” file listed on the Installation Manuals page, available here or “Attaching an Automatic Opener to “Sandwich Construction” Garage Doors Using Punched Angle,” available here.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item title=”My garage door has two springs, if one of my springs broke should I replace both at the same time?”]

We highly recommend that you change both springs at the same time, since both springs have been under the
same amount of stress each time the door has been opened and closed. Unfortunately a visual inspection of the spring cannot determine the further life expectancy of the spring. However, in many cases it will cost less to have both springs changed at the same time than if you only had one spring changed at a time. In addition, if you have extension springs on your door, the door may not balance properly with one new spring and one fatigued spring.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item title=”My spring broke very close to the end of the spring. Can I just throw away the part that broke off and reuse the rest of the old spring without having any problems?”]

NO. The remaining unbroken part of the spring should never be reused. Not only is the old spring fatigued for the full length of the spring and could easily break again at any moment, changing the length of the spring will also distort the lifting power of the spring and will not balance the weight of the garage door properly. Do not attempt to replace the spring yourself and have it changed by a qualified service technician.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item title=”The two bottom sections of my garage door were damaged by a car bumping into the door. Can the two sections be replaced?”]

Yes the two bottom sections can be replaced as long as the sections are still available (many older garage doors have sections that are no longer made and it may be very difficult to find an exact match). However, in many cases the cost of the two sections and the labor to replace them may be very close to the cost of a brand new replacement garage door that will have all new track, springs, and hardware included along with the door sections as well as a better warranty.

[/et_pb_accordion_item][et_pb_accordion_item title=”What information do I need to find replacement sections for my garage door?”]

Each manufacturer uses a different construction for their sections and replacements have to be the same model. To find sections for your door you will need to know the manufacturer, series or model and in some cases an order number may help as well.  All of this information should be printed on a label usually located on the edge of the door section or on the track.  The information on the opener will not be the same as the manufacturer of the door.

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